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Index
Glossary










































Table of Contents
Index
Glossary
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Next: Procedure Up: Guidelines for a modular Previous: Composition

   
Physics content

Characterise the physics content of the information by means of index terms. The editorial board of a particular journal can specify what kind of index terms are allowed. If there exists a standard, certified and maintained classification for the domain at hand, it should be taken into account. In the domain of experimental molecular dynamics, the INSPEC Physics Abstracts classification scheme and the similar Physics and Astronomy Classification Scheme (PACS) are standard.

The editorial board of a journal can stipulate that only index terms derived from the standard classifications may be used. They can also stipulate that the controlled classification codes and keywords can be complemented by uncontrolled terms, which the author considers to be relevant but which are not included in the official classification. In that case, the uncontrolled terms must be explicitly indicated as such. The board can also allow for any scientific or technical term to be used in the characterisation of the information. Readers can also use free text searching to locate the information by its content, instead of using the index terms, or in addition to the index terms. The advantage of using standardised index terms is that the recall is not lowered by variations in the formulation of the label.
\begin{13986}\emph{Example:} Let us consider a reactive scattering process in wh...
...h as \lq scattering[K,${\rm Br_2}$ ;KBr,Br;1eV]'.{</P>}
{<P>}
\end{13986}
Example: Let us consider a reactive scattering process in which K atoms collides with ${\rm Br_2}$ molecules, forming KBr and Br. The information can be characterised by a single compound label such as `scattering ${\rm K + Br_2 \to KBr + Br}$'. It can also be characterised by a set of five equivalent, unstructured simple labels, such as `reactive scattering', `K', ` ${\rm Br_2}$', `KBr' and `Br'. Information about scattering processes can also be represented in a structured multidimensional space. It is at least spanned by the following dimensions: a dimension representing the type of scattering (elastic, inelastic, reactive), two incoming interactants, one with the products, and also a dimension with the energy range. Just as every colour has a hue, a saturation and a brightness, every scattering process has its interactants, product and energy. In terms of keywords, the information on the scattering process can then be represented in a complex characterisation with arguments, such as `scattering[K, ${\rm Br_2}$;KBr,Br;1eV]'.



Next: Procedure Up: Guidelines for a modular Previous: Composition