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Index
Glossary










































Table of Contents
Index
Glossary
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Next: Positioning (m2) Up: Modules Previous: Modules

   
Meta-information (m1)

The editorial board or the publisher will have to specify what meta-information is precisely required, in what format, and who is responsible for it - the author or the publisher. The different types of metadata and their manipulation are discussed from the angle of SGML.

The unique identification has to be standardised for all publications in a wide area. It would be handy if that unique identification could tell the expert something about the article, for example, by encoding the journal name, the date and the type of module. Currently, there are various initiatives to assign a unique identification to publications [Paskin, 1999].


\begin{14014}\begin{itemize}
\item the family name and either the initials or t...
...dress of a home page and an address for postal mail.
\end{itemize}
\end{14014}
The editorial board or publisher of a particular modular journal should provide specific rules for these bibliographic data in order to standardise them. Author names, for example, may cause many problems in practice. In general, each author's family name and first names should be provided in a particular format: first names first or first names last, in full or in terms of initials.

Things get complicated when authors have non-standard western names, for instance, without a specific first name. Even if the structure of the author names has been determined, the spelling and in particular in transcription of non-western alphabets, can vary. In for instance [Borgman and Siegfried, 1992], these problems are discussed in detail.

The format of the addresses should also be specified: how to present the address for surface mail, for example, and whether the address for `traditional' mail, the e-mail address and the URL of a home page are compulsory or optional.

The current addresses must be updated when authors move and they must be removed when authors can no longer be contacted. This kind of update can be organised by way of databases of universities, learned societies or publishers.

The publisher has to provide the date of the publication of the article. If modules are modified after publication, the date of the modification has to be included, specified by module.

The date when the publisher first received the manuscript may be included, as well as the date the publisher received a revised version and the date of acceptance, if these dates are made explicit by the publisher. These metadata can be standardised over a wide range of journals.


\begin{14015}% latex2html id marker
\noindent\subsubsub{Lists of physics index ...
... module (or its constituent modules) is summarised.
\end{itemize}
\end{14015}

Specific guidelines can be given for the process of composing and evaluating an abstract. See [Van der Tol, 1999].
\begin{14016}\begin{itemize}
\item Provide a link from the abstract (carrying a...
...module in the article where the reference was made.
\end{itemize}
\end{14016}
The editorial board or publisher of the particular journal normally prescribe a specific style for standardising the references in these lists, as well as the way the references are denoted in the discourse in the modules. An example of an existing style is given in the Chicago Manual of Style [Grossman, 1993].


\begin{14017}\noindent\subsubsub{Acknowledgements (m1f)} \index{Acknowledgements...
...temize}
\index{Meta-information module\vert)}{</P>}
{<P>}
\end{14017}
Acknowledgements (m1f)  

 



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