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Next: The characterisation by the Up: Modules Previous: m6 OUTCOME

   
4.2.3 The domain-oriented characterisation

The most obvious aspect by which information in scientific articles is characterised is from a domain-oriented point of view, by its contents. Using this characterisation complementarily to the characterisation by the conceptual function given in the previous section, we can distinguish, for instance, between different Treated results modules focusing on different reactions.

The domain-oriented characterisation is generally implemented in index terms, such as key words or classification codes. The index terms can be uncontrolled terms invented by the author, or controlled terms that are derived from a classification certified and maintained by some indexing authority. The characterisation space of this aspect of the information is spanned by at least one dimension, with a variable corresponding with the elementary scientific concepts. But for an adequate representation, the conceptual space should be spanned by more than one dimension, allowing for a complex domain-oriented characterisation using different key words. The number of dimensions spanning the space is not limited a priori, but dependent on the requirements for an adequate representation.

We do not include in the modular model a detailed characterisation space for the domain-oriented characterisation. The development of a suitable characterisation of information by its subject is the key issue in the field of Information Retrieval.4.16 With respect to the geometry of a domain-oriented characterisation space, in the area of Information Retrieval, `concept maps' are developed with a geometry and a sensible notion of distance [Salton, 1983]. Therefore, we assume that there will be a suitable domain-oriented typology available to characterise the scientific content of the information. (As an illustration, some of the terms we used are given in table 4.1.)


 
Table 4.1: An excerpt of the physics terms we used in the modularised articles. The terms are organised in a hierarachy of general and more specific terms. Terms like `cross section' can have arguments, e.g. specifying particles involved in the collision; the different types of particles are given under the heading `materials'.
SCATTERING:
INSTRUMENTATION Molecular beam techniques[source;selection;interaction;analysis;detection;energy]
      SOURCES: sputtering, charge-exchange, ...
    [...] DETECTORS: surface ionisation, ...
  [...]
QUANTITIES Cross section[reaction;material1;material2;energy]
    Total cross section [reaction;material1;material2;energy]
    Differential cross section [reaction;material1;material2;energy]
  [...]
MOLECULAR DYNAMICS:
REACTIONS charge transfer
    ion-pair formation
      chemi-ionisation
  [...]
MATERIALS: electropositive atoms molecules
    alkali: K, Na, Li  
  electronegative    
    halogen: I, Br, Cl ${\rm I_2}$, ${\rm Br_2}$, ${\rm Cl_2}$
      O, N, ... ${\rm O_2}$, ${\rm N_2}$, ${\rm NO_2}$...
  [...]