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Table of Contents
Index
Glossary










































Table of Contents
Index
Glossary
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Next: Overlap Up: The adequacy of modular Previous: The level of focusing

  
The level of detail

Part of the target audience of A05 and A08 are less informed readers who aim for a full understanding of e.g. the experimental methods or the calculations performed using the theoretical methods to interpret the results. They require more details than the original versions of A05 and A08 provide. Writing a new modular article in an electronic environment, an author can include all required information, because there are no technical restrictions on the amount of details that can be provided. Recasting existing articles in modular form, we were unable to include the relevant details that were unavailable, but we have indicated where they could be provided.

From the perspective of readers who (at a particular moment) wish to grasp just the main lines of reasoning concerning a particular aspect of the research, the original versions provide, on the contrary, too many details to suit their needs. These details are not only redundant for these readers, but they also reduce the clarity. The main line of reasoning is often obscured by these details.

To solve this problem, the author of a printed article can make use of a paper-based form of hypertext: the main text refers to footnotes, endnotes and appendices. In physics articles, and in particular in the corpus articles, footnotes and endnotes are very unusual. The original A08 contains a few notes, but these are presented in the main text, at the end of section 6.Comparison of the measurements and the calculations and section 8.Rotational coupling. Appendices are used more often. For example, in A05 the mathematical details of the estimation of the wavelength are presented in an appendix. Likewise in the  journal Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry the section with full description of the experimental methods is given at the end of the articles, after the conclusions. Another method of hiding such details is to use a smaller font size. As is pointed out in [Berkenkotter and Huckin, 1995, p.37], the Methods section of the Journal of Biological Chemistry is printed as a supplement in miniprint. The editors note that ``miniprint is easily read with the aid of a magnifying glass''.

An electronic and modular environment is better suited for dealing with these contradictory needs for full detail and for a smooth, readable discourse . If the required details are part of a separate self-contained account (e.g. in a mesoscopic or macroscopic module), they can be made available to the reader of the discourse at hand by means of a link expressing that fact that the target provides details on the source. If the details do not form a self-contained account, they are presented within the module at hand, hidden from view.5.14 For example, in the Quantitative interpretation A08-m5bi the different steps of the full calculation are outlined and the details of the calculations are hidden. In the electronic presentation of the modular versions of A05 and A08, the details are hidden in such a way that they can be unfolded and included in the discourse on the reader's demand. In the presentation of the modules, we have indicated the parts of the module that are hidden typographically.



Next: Overlap Up: The adequacy of modular Previous: The level of focusing